What to Bring

  • The text and materials for your courses. There are no extra copies available if you forget to bring them.
  • Mexican Tourist Card with 60-day authorization and proof of your American citizenship (U.S. passport).
  • A good Spanish/English Dictionary purchased in the U.S. They are hard to find (and often expensive) in Mexico.
  • Sufficient travelers checks and/or ATM card and some Mexican pesos.
  • A state driver's license or picture identification card so that you can cash travelers checks at the local bank.
  • Rain gear and practical clothing. Normally the weather is sunny and pleasant but when it rains, sometimes it pours!
  • A sweater or jacket. You should be prepared for both hot and cool weather. Many students have made the mistake of not bringing warm clothing and have lived to regret it.
  • Bring comfortable clothes that are easy to wash and need little ironing.
  • Tennis shoes or other flat-heeled practical shoes. Streets in Guanajuato are hilly and cobble stoned. There are places to hike and picnic on the outskirts of Guanajuato.
  • At least one nice outfit. There are a few occasions that call for nice clothes. Guanajuato is a very cultural city. There are symphonies, ballets etc. that you may choose to attend.
  • A large bath towel and a wash cloth. Normally they are not provided in homes or even in the local hotels.
  • A compact study lamp and a cassette player can be useful, (so will extra batteries). You will be able to purchase school supplies, such as paper and pens that you will need in Guanajuato.
  • There are no computers or typewriters available for student use at the University of Guanajuato.
  • Reading material. There are few stores in Guanajuato that sell English reading material. What is available is expensive.
  • If you wear glasses or contacts, bring a spare pair or at least your prescription. If you take medicine regularly, bring a supply for your entire stay. Medicine can be expensive in Mexico.
  • Pepto-Bismol or other medicine for indigestion. Intestinal upset is a frequent problem in Mexico. The best preventative is not to drink the tap water or eat from the vendors on the street. If you become ill, Pepto-Bismol generally provides relief. Imodium is also effective. Bring a generous supply with you.
  • A good guide book to Mexico. The Lonely Planet Guide to Mexico is a very useful guidebook. Even if you don't plan to travel in Mexico, a good guidebook can be invaluable. In addition to providing information on hotels and restaurants, a really good one will not only tell about the sightseeing available but how to get to where you're going, what to look for and what to ask for at your destination.
  • A small flashlight with batteries (for occasional power outages).